Check Out These Other Pages At Hoseheads

Hoseheads Sprint Car News

Bill W's Knoxville News Bill Wright

KO's Indiana Bullring Scene Kevin Oldham

From the Grandstand Ron Rodda

Wagsworld Ken Wagner

Keeping Track  Dino Oberto

Tri-State Outlook Duane Hancock

Hawkeye Ovals Eric Arnold

Runnin The High Groove Paul Kuyawa

Hoosier Race Report Danny Burton

Not Just Another Racing Column Pastor Dudley Balmer

Dirt Divas Camisha Miller

Hoseheads Forum

2014 Schedules

Links

Hoseheads Classifieds

Race Results

Press Releases

All Stars

USCS

World of Outlaws

ASCS

USAC

Central PA

IRA

Hoseheads !LIVE!

    HosheadsNew.jpg (27139 bytes)

    From The Grandstand

    by Ron Rodda

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

     

    Lincoln, CA…A recent acquisition by Colfax driver, Colby Wiesz, is paying dividends.  When Northwest driver, Mitch Olson, sold his equipment Wiesz purchased a KPC chassis and has now posted a win and a 2nd in two starts.  He called the win on April 5th at Marysville the result of driving the best car he has ever driven, having hit the setup just right.

     

                With over 50 wins at Marysville, Wiesz hardly needs an edge when it comes to tackling the quarter mile, but his new car appears to make it even harder to keep him off the top podium spot.  Enjoying one of the best Marysville mains I have ever seen on April 12th, Wiesz was a couple feet short of another win, settling for 2nd after a furious finish.

     

                Some of what he can do with this KPC ride was shown in his heat, storming to a win from 6th starting, using low and high side passes for that effort.  The main for the 22 car field was set by the top six qualifiers that earned a top 4 after invert six heats participating in a redraw. 

     

    The KPC ride for Colby Wiesz is working out well for him.

     

                Before the green flag had a chance to completely unfurl, a massive pileup at the turn 4 exit damaged several cars with 8 involved total.  After some tow truck trips to the pit with dangling front end parts for a few, the restart was designated to be single file.

     

                With the pole car gone, Jeremy Burt and the rest of the inside line moved forward one spot.  But since the new initial start was deemed to be single file, it seemed odd to me that Burt was in front of the original front row outside car, Wiesz.  If the restart was double file, then Burt does belong on the pole alongside Wiesz.  But when the restart is single file, it seems to me the initial grid would be used to create the line with involved cars removed.  That would have put the order at the front as Wiesz, Burt, and Mike Stallings.

     

                That lineup restart procedure may have created the dramatic 20 lap main that followed.  Three yellows appeared, but when the final 14 laps were nonstop and race long leader Burt hit traffic with 5 or so to go, things got really interesting as Wiesz and John Michael Bunch closed on Burt.

     

                Getting steadily closer to the front, Weisz and Bunch joined Burt for a frantic last lap, leading to a 3 wide race from turn 4 to the line to claim the victory.  Burt was able to reach the checkers just ahead of Weisz who in turn barely edged Bunch.  From the pit grandstand angle it was hard to see who finished where it was that close.

     

    The pit grandstands put the Marysville quarter at ones feet.

     

     

                As to the pit grandstands, the view from the western facing location is excellent, allowing one to view the entire track with just minor head swiveling.  Added a few years ago, it gives a spot for a different view of an oval than usual, but it does come with a price.  When the oval is on the damp side, tiny rockets disguised as clay blobs pelt the pit stand dwellers with veracity.  As the evening progresses the onslaught of right rear launched missiles lessens, making it a small price to pay for the view.

     

                The nonwing spec sprint group numbered 10 with Josh Vieira leading 4 laps from the pole until Tim Sherman Jr. used the top line in turns 1 and 2 to take over and go on to collect the win.  Also on hand were three fendered divisions with an additional 37 race teams to complete the full card.  A well run program on a very racy and quick track with not a speck of dust combined for an entertaining evening.

     

    Tim Sherman Jr. drove this nonwing spec sprint to a win

     

                It was good to see the King of the West sprints drew a quality 31 car field to the Tulare Thunderbowl as they finally opened their season.  Tommy Tarlton won at what could be called his home track.  The only other appearance by the King of the West teams at the Thunderbowl this season is May 17th, and a very strong program is planned.  KWS drivers will share the track with USAC West Coast teams with IMCA modifieds included for a big night.  Anytime winged and nonwing classes are on the same menu, a full night results.

     

     

     

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

     

    Lincoln, CA…First was Chico’s opening race, a two day Silver Cup back on the 2nd weekend of March.  Then it was Marysville the following Saturday when they held their opener, a Civil War race.  Last Saturday it was Placerville’s turn for their opening show, a four division point night.  All three tracks had very successful season starters and now it is Petaluma’s turn this coming Saturday.

     

                Placerville packed both the pits and stands, not a surprise on either count.  An excellent field of 30 winged 360 sprints was assisted by 62 support division entries over three classes.  That is the most cars I have seen in the foothill quarter mile pit area in a long time, maybe the most ever since my 2002 track regular status being established.

     

                The sprint field was so strong it was essentially a Civil War race.  With Petaluma and Golden State King of the West opening their seasons the following week, Placerville was the beneficiary.  The now common Northern California format of invert 4, take four heats moved the winner plus the next fastest 4 qualifiers to secure a top 4 finish to a redraw.

     

                Third quick, Andy Gregg, drew the pole while heat 2 winner, Scott Parker picked outside row one.  Steven Tiner won a heat and drew inside row 2 while Matt Peterson made the redraw when fast timer, Matt Barber, did not garner a top 4.  Peterson started 4th and played a huge part in the main event.

     

                Row 3 was filled by 4th quick Willie Croft and heat winner Andy Forsberg, and the final redraw row had heat winner James Sweeney and 2nd quick Jimmy Trulli.  Tough luck for front row starter Parker allowed the outside line to move forward a spot before a lap was scored and Peterson was on the front row when the green finally flew.

     

                Peterson took the initial lead with Gregg and Forsberg in pursuit, an order that held for 4 laps before Tiner made a 4th to 2nd move on the 5th circuit, using the bottom groove in turns 3 and 4 for the dramatic gain.  It was just a lap later when Forsberg took 2nd from Tiner as the packed stands got to enjoy the last 20 laps running nonstop.

     

                Peterson continued his strong run at the front until wandering just a bit high in turn 4 on the 16th lap and Forsberg drove under him to take the lead.  The same Peterson tiny bobble 4 laps later in the same turn allowed Tiner to take 2nd and pressure Forsberg the final handful of laps.

     

                Excellent track conditions plus the long green flag session made this a main event that showcased Placerville at its best.  Forsberg won yet another trophy at the track which has been the site of much of his success while Tiner settled for 2nd and Peterson claimed 3rd.  It is so nice to get a long stretch of laps without any yellows.

     

                An eye opening announcement came out of Yuma AZ this week when a January big dollar series of winged 410 sprint races were announced.  The four races will pay $12,000 to win and $1,000 to start, certain to bring a strong field to the 3/8 Cocopah Speedway.  Listed dates are the 2nd and 3rd followed by another pair of shows a week later on the 9th and 10th.

     

                Cocopah reopened in 2010 after a decade of silence.  The casino across the road from the clay oval purchased the track in 2005 and started renovations in January of 2010.  Since then it has become a big player in the ASCS National scene.   I made my first visit in November of the reopening year, just its 3rd or so race since returning from dormancy, and I was shocked what good condition it was in after a decade of silence.

     

                Improvements since that first visit certainly include enticing Washington state resident Greg Burgess to relocate to Yuma and become the track’s general manager.  Burgess made a huge climate change, going from one of the rainiest locations in the country to the sunniest city in the U.S.  Burgess was the ASCS Northwest competition director when I first met him.

     

                Although a little more than six months away, the priority entry forms for the 21st Annual Trophy Cup will be mailed in a few days, sent to all teams that participated last year.  That group has until the end of May to send in their entry, after that date available spots in the field will be open to any team. 

     

                The new format for 2014 will run all cars on Thursday and Friday with drivers being able to pick their better point night of the two for setting Saturday’s lineups.  Nonwing sprints are no longer part of the event after a very mediocre car count during the two years they were included.  Last year’s finishes will be tough to top, but somehow it will probably happen in Tulare come this October.

     

     

     

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

     

    Lincoln, CA….Driven south last weekend by Northern California’s suddenly rainy season, it turned into an enjoyable outing, visiting a rarely seen facility along with another stop at a track vacant from the notebook for several years.  In between that pair was an enjoyable season opener, all completed with no rain causing complications.  In fact, rain was an assist this time.

     

                While our drought and accompanying water shortage had been eased by a literal drop in the bucket, the last month saw 10 days of measurable rain, although some days it was a small amount.  That is more days than the prior 4 months combined, the heart of the rainy season.  Many acres of Central California farmland will grow nothing this summer as there won’t be water available.  The result, higher prices for many things due to the supply vs. demand ratio.

     

                Friday opened the action at Plaza Park Raceway, located just off highway 99 at the west edge of Visalia.  The 1/5 mile dirt oval is now promoted by Kyle Evans, also the promoter of Lemoore Raceway, located 25 miles west of Plaza.  Lemoore runs the same divisions on Saturday allowing many two race weekends for area teams with little travel.

     

                Running junior sprints for drivers age 5 to 12 along with 3 classes of micro sprints provides full fields and an action filled evening.  Bryce Eames used an outside front row start to win the junior sprint main over a 14 car field, a nonstop run.  Cody Smothermon led 10 laps of the 21 car nonwing main before Ryan Reeves used a low groove turn 1 pass to win over Smothermon and TJ Smith.

     

                The nonwing, restricted, and super classes all use a version of a 600cc engine and 18 restricted were on hand.  Their main was a little messy, but once the multi-car mess was cleared at the start, things went smoothly.  Nathan Rolfe led 20 laps until Ryan Deslile used the bottom of turn 2 on a restart to take the lead and eventual win.  Cole Macedo and Kyle Offil completed the podium.

     

                The super 600 field was the largest at 24 and Ryan Reeves led that one for 7 laps until Michael Faccinto drove past him on the back stretch.  Faccinto led the rest of the 30 laps to win over Jake Hagopian and Reeves.  Many drivers are sons and daughters of fathers that raced all over the San Joaquin Valley themselves. 

     

                Plaza’s concrete grandstands offer excellent sight lines, lighting is very good, with only the PA system inadequate.  The show was well run and this season opener drew a large crowd.  The oval was a bit too fast and narrow, but racing was still good with most races having a tight battle for the lead.  Fewer races are scheduled this year which may help keep the car count strong.

     

                The next night was spent at Kings Speedway, about halfway between Plaza and Lemoore Raceways, all off of highway 198.  Hanford’s 3/8 track has received a noticeable improvement in lighting and a new guardrail in turn 1 will keep errant cars from getting too far south of the track.  New clay and what seemed to be a wider turn 1 and 2 area combined to make it better than ever.

     

                The event featured late models as it was labeled the Gary Jacob Memorial race.  Gary was a very dedicated race journalist and late model specialist who would travel great distances to cover races.  His knowledge about racing was legendary.  Since his passing in 2006 he has not, nor ever will, been replaced as that is just not possible.  The fact the race night was in his memory was mentioned at the driver meeting, but I did not hear one word in the grandstands from the PA system to honor Gary.

     

                Supporting the late models were 24 USAC West Coast nonwing 360s for their 4th point race.  Austin Liggett won his first ever West Coast race at Las Vegas in the point opener, Dennis Howell won at Tulare, Troy Rutherford took Tulare, and now Jace Vander Weerd has a win after Hanford.  Marcus Niemela is the current point leader.

     

                Qualifying was a tough deal for Liggett and Matt Mitchell with tough tumbles.  Liggett was done and Mitchell’s ride was not ready to qualify, but tagged a heat.  It was refreshing to watch invert 6, take 4 heats, putting Nick Faas in row 3 following his 15.610 quick time.

     

                Despite the track showing wear by main event time and a little rut action here and there, it was still a good main event.  J. Vander Weerd led 11 laps before Michael Pickens drove under Vander Weerd in turn 2 to lead.  That lasted until the 22nd lap was trying to end when Pickens spun in turn 4 and Vander Weerd was again in front.

     

                Faas put some pressure on the leader but the last few laps saw Vander Weerd’s lead improve and the Visalia driver collected the win over Faas and 21st starting Mitchell.  Using a slider in turn 1 on lap 26, Mitchell had taken 3rd for an 18 position gain and maybe one more yellow could have seen him gain more.  Some really good position battles over the 30 laps kept the Kings tradition of how special nonwing racing is at Hanford intact.

     

    This unusual NCMA car of Don Arriaz has a mosquito abatement sponsor.

     

                Weather gave me an opportunity to visit Madera Speedway after several years of absence.  The track moved their Saturday show to Sunday afternoon due to weather concerns, and the third mile paved track is conveniently right on my way north to home base.

     

                The fairgrounds and track look very good, one of the nicer appearing facilities in the state.  While what cars were on hand were beautiful, there just was not enough of them in all but the BCRA/USAC co-sanctioned midgets.  Those dozen cars were led all 30 laps by Darrin Snider for that win.  The 7 USAC Ignite midgets followed the same scenario when Jake Swanson led all the way for that trophy.

     

    Sprints of Cody Gerhardt (L) and Tim Skoglund (R))

     

                Seven was the magic number as hobby stock, vintage sprints, vintage midgets, and the winged sprint/supermodified mixed group had that number for entries.  Kyle Vanderpool took that win in the visually odd mix of two distinct body styles.  Only 4 NCMA sprints were present and Audra Saselli was the winner.

     

    Mix of winged cars in a sprint/supermodified heat.

     

                Perhaps the one day delay cut into the car count, but nevertheless it was nice to return to the tidy facility, and on a perfect afternoon of weather, too.  The show was run in a timely manner, but the number of events presented could have been lessened.

     

                Early week rains are scheduled to end tonight, hopefully allowing tracks to get in all their events next weekend after wide spread cancellations to end March.

     

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

    Lincoln, CA…The new era of the California Civil War Sprint Car Series for winged 360s started Saturday in Marysville. A new series owner and new format led to an all new look to things, but some things remained unchanged. Those include two significant items, drawing a very strong field of drivers and putting on an intense evening of racing.

    One of the largest crowds since Paul and Kathy Hawes took over the track in 2007 jammed the quarter mile’s grandstands, also enjoying near record high temperatures and the work of series announcer, Troy Hennig. While the mid-March date can be shaky even in Northern California, an 81 degree day and accompanying sunshine along with fans’ hunger for some sprint car action created the superb turnout.

    A new format that pleases some but certainly not others inverts 4 in heat races and takes the top 4 finishers to the A main. The first dash in Civil War history was formed from the four heat race winners plus the next fastest 4 to earn an A main transfer. Those 8 drew for dash starting spots to set the first four rows. Sound familiar? It should, as this seems to have become the format of choice.

    Before the change, Civil War racing used invert 6, take 4 heats and pulled a pill to set the inversion with an option as high as 10 in the bag. The redraw for the dash offers some interest with the new program, but I would still rather the dash not happen and the redraw 4 row setup just goes directly to the A main. Using double file restarts is another new series wrinkle and it certain made for a more competitive main for the opening race.

    Jonathan Allard put his new team’s 3C ride into the fast time slot, followed by Alyssa Geving, Andy Gregg, and Tommy Tarlton. Justin Sanders got a main transfer when Tarlton missed the top 4 finish, otherwise it was the front two rows taking the top 4 heat spots.

    Gregg drew the pole for the dash, which he then won to get the A main pole. Geving went from 4th to 2nd in the dash to share the front row for the 30 lap, $2000 to win main. Despite 6 yellows and a red in the main, the show was so efficiently run that it was just past 9:30 when the checkers flew for the first new era Civil War winner.

    Andy Gregg led all 30 laps to win, which sounds like it might have been a mundane race. It was, however, one of the more interesting races I have seen in Marysville, combing fast cars on a fast surface with plenty of drama along with cars making huge gains over their starting spot.

    It was Gregg, Geving, and Allard for 10 laps before a restart saw things go sour for Allard. Bicycling entering turn 2, Allard put the 3C on its side and was hammered by an oncoming car. A scary deal turned out OK when Allard emerged unhurt, in fact was able to repair and restart although 12th starting Geoff Ensign now had the 3rd spot.

    Gregg hit traffic despite the flow of yellows soon after the green appeared each time and Geving put intense pressure on the leader. At one point the top 3 ran as a tightly bunched trio. Sean Becker took 3rd on lap 20 before a lap 23 spin in turn 2 nixed the challenge from Geving. Sean Becker was now 2nd ahead of Ensign. A lap 24 wheelie entering turn 3 put Becker into 3rd and a lap later 22nd starting Herman Klein drove past Becker for 3rd, using the outer groove out of turn 2.

    The last six laps after the final yellow saw Gregg hold on for the win over Ensign and Becker who regained 3rd by slipping under Klein in turn 2 on the 28th circuit. Klein was 4th for a fine effort and multi-time series champion, Andy Forsberg, was 5th after also coming from the back. Forsberg pitted early with a sour sounding engine but a quick fix got him back without losing a lap. The main event was great to get the series off on a good start and there is no question that double file restarts made it much more exciting.

    The night before Chico continued the March winged 360 program and 19 were on hand, assisted by 3 support divisions. The same format as Civil War minus the dash, just a redraw, has been used this month at Silver Dollar Speedway and Sean Becker drew the pole. While Becker did score the expected win from his priority starting spot, Adam Brenton made it very interesting for a while, running some of the best laps I have witnessed from the young Browns Valley based driver.

    Brenton started outside front row and led 8 laps before Becker used a topside move out of turn 4 to take the lead and eventual win. Andy Gregg set the tone for his win the next night by taking 2nd from his 7th starting position start over Billy Wallace, Kirt Organ, and John Michael Bunch. A very rare nonstop sprint main allowed me to make the 72 mile drive home and arrive before 11pm, a rare occurrence indeed.

    Between entertaining racing, superb weather, and efficiently run shows, the mid-March weekend was a winner on all counts. The next Civil War race is the 29th at Antioch while Chico offers another 360 program this coming Friday.

     

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

    Lincoln, CA… Records for little rain fell over the last couple of months with nearly none for the normally rainy months of December and January. Finally the pattern changed, just in time to lead to canceling the opening Northern California sprint car race at Marysville on March 1st. That track should hold their opener this coming Saturday with the year’s first Civil War race.

    Last week it rained nearly 2 inches in Chico between Sunday and Thursday. Added to prior moisture, the potential for holding the Silver Cup on Friday and Saturday was somewhere between zero and none. However, promoter Dennis Gage was not deterred by flooded pits and ran 6 pumps around the clock. Assisted by prior treatment of the ground and many supporting cast members, the place was useable and an excellent Silver Cup event occurred.

    It was a special event for several reasons. Just the fact that it happened was remarkable, and when great weather for the weekend was assisted by strong fields and very good racing, it made let this often rained out event prevail for 2014. As if that wasn’t enough, enjoying the superb kettle corn of Chico made it even better.

    Friday the heavier haulers were kept west of the regular pit area and parked on a paved surface. The non-big rig teams used the normal pit area and drivers commented on how good the pits looked despite the adverse weather for the days prior. Saturday things were more solid and anyone could use the regular pit, although the south end was still way too wet and the overflow was along pit road.

    The Silver Cup has always offered a division other than sprint cars as the featured class. This 2nd year of the track being IMCA sanctioned for modifieds helped draw 33 on Friday and an outstanding 43 cars on Saturday. Remarkable for a track that usually gets 10 at best for that class for point shows.

    Winged 360s drew 22 on Friday and 28 on Saturday with both nights having strong fields, particularly night two. Adding the likes of Andy Gregg, Brad Furr, Rico Abreu, and Henry Van Dam to the already quality Friday group made the competition a notch tougher on Saturday.

    Unfortunately, it seems as if it is cookie cutter time for creative formats in Northern California. Inverting four in heats and taking the heat winner plus the next fastest four (five on Friday) to make a top four in the heat to a redraw means the fastest car in each heat has no need to pass anybody. At least the top 8 redrew as opposed to running a dash.

    Friday’s winner of the redraw was Andy Forsberg, joined on the front row by Jayme Barnes. The two ran some excellent laps on a track that had two distinct grooves, very low and topside, with canyons between. Turn 4 was particularly canyon-like, created by excessive rain and a soft track. Instead of dampening the racing quality, it seemed as if the terrain made it better.

    Barnes led with Forsberg and Steven Tiner in pursuit until Forsberg took the lead from the turn 4 low groove as Barnes slid up to the wall. That lasted two laps when, with 8 complete. Forsberg flipped in turn 4 after catching a rut. Back in the lead, Barnes had Shane Golobic on his tail until a sideways slip in turn 4 put Tiner back in 3rd and 8th starting Sean Becker now in 3rd.

    Becker used the bottom of turn 2 for passes on laps 14 and 16 to lead for the last 10 laps. Golobic regained the runner up spot with a low side effort in turn 4 on the 22nd lap and Barnes finished 3rd. The slim 9 car nonwing spec sprint field saw 4th starting Scott Hall win over Rowdy McClenon and Shane Myhre.

    Saturday added 6 winged 360s and the same increase in spec sprints. Rico Abreu drew the pole with Andy Gregg outside for the 30 lap test. Becker started 4th in his quest for a sweep, sharing row 2 with Justin Sanders while Tiner and Brad Furr anchored row 3.

    Gregg took off and Abreu slipped to 4th after a few laps. Sanders ran 2nd until slipping above the turn 4 ruts and Becker took 2nd with a dozen complete. Abreu got inside Sanders in turn 4 to run 3rd after 17 and made dramatic moves 5 laps later.

    A restart with 22 scored led to Abreu building up momentum entering turn 1 after the restart and use that speed to drive past Becker on the top of turn 2. A lap later he raced under Gregg on turn 4’s lower reached and led the last 7 laps for the win over Becker and Gregg. Golobic lost an engine early in the Saturday show to end his weekend. Following a Yuma sweep in ASCS racing, Abreu is 3 for 3 in winged 360 action.

    The 15 car spec sprint field was dominated by outside front row starter, Tommy Laliberte. Leading all 15 laps, he dealt successfully with several challenges by Joe Stornetta for the win over Stornetta and Taylor Nelson. Silver Dollar will feature winged 360s again this Friday with a superb weather forecast this time.

    Returning to Chico for the first time since the end of last September, this version of the Silver Cup seemed like one of the best since I became a track regular in mid-2002. Many people had a hand in getting the facility ready for the weekend and the show rewarded that effort.

    Chico is also home to another top notch effort. Last year I tested the kettle corn at every track at which that option was available. After scientific taste testing, the results are clear and the best kettle corn award goes to the Silver Dollar vender. Ma and Pa’s Kettle corn is available at both Chico and Marysville and provides an excellent product. They provided the “icing on the cake” that was baked by the race teams that put on an excellent show.

     

     

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

    Lincoln CA…The last sprint car action of 2013 and the first of 2014 for my viewing pleasure utilized the same piece of clay, namely the quarter mile at Canyon Speedway Park a few miles northwest of Phoenix. Last November was the Western Worlds and was my first racing event at the desert oval in quite a few years. It seemed strange after such a lengthy absence prior to return to the facility last weekend for the Winter Classic.

    We were able to take in the first two races of the six race schedule, one that concludes this weekend with a trio of events. We spent much of January in sunny and mild Arizona, first at Tucson International Speedway with one race at Arizona Speedway mixed in for variety. Tucson drew star filled fields of late models and modifieds with most of the late model drivers from back east and plenty of North and South Dakota based modified drivers included.

    Arizona Speedway is a high-banked racy quarter mile that will be in its 4th season, a track that could be somewhat considered as Manzanita East. Stands, fencing, and various other items that are now part of Arizona Speedway came from Manzanita Speedway. Owner and promoter, Jonah Trussel, is a very hands on type person, as is Kevin Montgomery at Canyon, and Trussel acquired the rights to promote Central Arizona Raceway earlier this month. The Casa Grande track was in limbo after the prior promoter moved on. Arizona Speedway and CAR will host sprint car events, but Canyon is far more involved in open wheel action with a schedule dominated by big events.

    With three tracks operating in the Phoenix metropolitan area and the ability to race year round with the mild winter, the Arizona scene for racing looks bright. The only issue is something called summer when triple digits make outdoor activities trying, no matter how dry the air is.

    Last year were at Canyon Speedway Park in late January, unfortunately so was the rain and the first weekend of the Winter Classic was completely rained out. When Friday evening was canceled, I checked the forecast and saw gloom and doom and headed for home. This year the only reason to check the forecast was to see how close to 80 the temperature would be. As nice as the weather was for our earlier Grand Canyon State adventures, Canyon got the best days of our trip.

    On tap were USAC Southwest nonwing 360 sprint cars with a 24 car field both of our nights, and over 30 IMCA modifieds plus enough pure stocks, winged mini-sprints and mod lites. The sprint format used draw heats and moved the top 18 in passing/finishing points directly to the A main. Of the group, the top 6 in points were inverted. The ASCS point chart, my favorite version of all the passing point options, was used.

    Josh Pelkey and Casey Shuman were on the front row of Friday’s 30 lap finale. Pelkey led 12 laps while 13th starting Brady Bacon worked his way forward. That effort culminated with a bottom groove pass out of turn 4 on lap 13 and Bacon had the lead for the remaining laps. A lower groove effort by Bacon was the ticket for a win over Pelkey and R. J. Johnson, a 14th place starter. A two groove track made for excellent racing on Friday as after Shuman in 4th, Ryan Bernal was 5th and he started 15th.

    Saturday followed the same format leading to Ty Mihocko and Bernal on row one. Starting 4th, Dave Darland was behind Bernal until they reached traffic, leading to a high out of turn 4 effort by Darland. Bernal chose low when they encountered traffic, Darland went high and made the pass for the win over Bernal and once again, R. J. Johnson, a 15th place starter. Most drivers ran the top, but watching Bernal and Darland deal with traffic as well as each other made this one good.

    With nearly three times as many races over a three month period as I had watched for a career total at Canyon before, it almost feels like becoming a track regular at the facility that was once labeled the “Diamond in the Desert”.

     

     

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

    Casa Grande,AZ…It had been almost 9 years since I had seen racing at Canyon Speedway Park. An attempt to end that long void earlier this year was met with a three-day weekend completely rained out at the end of January. We entered Arizona for the first time ever when it was something other than January following the 320 car count Duel in the Desert at Las Vegas with Canyon the destination.

    The occasion was the 46th annual Western Worlds at the track once nicknamed the Diamond in the Desert. Formerly named Canyon Raceway, the high-banked quarter mile is a rarely seen venue for me, I think twice ever not counting the January loss this year. Spending three days at Canyon showed me it was a lucky choice to make a first time visit to Arizona in November. It also was my first time with sprints and midgets to enjoy as any prior visits were IMCA modified shows.

    These were also my first races at Canyon since coming under the leadership of Kevin Montgomery. Canyon was once the host of weekly live sprint car TV broadcasts on Sundays but apparently hard times fell on what was once the home of nationally viewed races. Montgomery took over as promoter a couple years back and the track is having nothing but success since.

    Despite the rustic last quarter mile or so of road needed to reach the facility, Canyon seems to run the most high profile events of any track out west. It is clear that Montgomery is not shy about risk taking as the Western Worlds $7,500 to win in both midgets and sprints showed.

    I recall reading in the RPM literature how a track’s schedule never should show “regular racing” on a given night. Canyon seems to understand that theory because reading the poster for each of their events always catches my eye, even from 800 miles away. With great weather for the week, the Thursday crowd seemed pretty good for that night, and the following two nights led to a packed house on Saturday.

    Right at 50 USAC Southwest and West Coast sprints raced the event and just over 30 USAC National midgets, all nonwinged of course to make it even better. The sprints were split between Thursday and Friday with 27 and 23 while midgets all raced both preliminary nights. Everyone was on hand Saturday for last chance type races and finales.

    The sprint format was wonderful for a while, draw heats with passing/finishing points then a set of qualifiers, really another round of heats, with 6 inverted by heat points and more passing/finishing points accumulated. Then it was not as good when the A mains on the first two nights were lined straight up by points.

    R. J. Johnson ran away with the Thursday sprint main and Bryan Clauson did the same on Friday. Some excellent position racing took place behind them, but the straight up start worked to their advantage to dominate. Both were high point cars with Johnson going from 6th to 2nd in his heat and 6th to 3rd in a qualifier. Clauson was perfect on Friday, winning a heat from 8th and qualifier from 6th. Clauson passed 15 cars in those two 8 lap races so he certainly earned the pole.

    Saturday’s main took the 8 locked in drivers from the first two nights and did a redraw thing for the dash to set the first four rows. Clauson went from 7th to 5th in the dash and used the bottom of turn 2 to take the lead and win in the sprint finale, collecting the $7,500 for his effort. Four yellows slowed the main but nothing slowed Clauson.

    For the three days, I felt the midgets put on better show, less tire, less engine equals more exciting racing. Their format was a standard qualifying, invert six heats, and four moving to the A main. Tanner Thorson got sideways in turn 2 and a quick recovery did not keep Christopher Bell from taking over and leading the last 23 laps for a win on Thursday.

    On Friday the same format resulted in Darren Hagen starting 4th and winning a very competitive main full of multi-groove racing and position battles. Points earned both nights moved the top 8 to Saturday’s final race with the field filled by qualifiers and B main transfers.

    By winning the sprint main, Clauson was the driver who could take the $5000 bonus by winning both mains. Starting on the pole following a dash win, Clauson went backwards for a while and a Hagen/Bell duel for the lead was outstanding. A very top groove coupled with a bottom that was very useful made for some top notch racing for the Western Worlds final main.

    Running 4th at one time, Clauson was only 3rd with 11 laps left but used the bottom of turn 4 on the 25th lap to grab 2nd. One more pass meant a lot more money for the former Northern California resident, and he made that pass in the most dramatic fashion possible.

    Building momentum entering turns 3 and 4 for the final lap, Clauson used the cushion while Hagen committed to the bottom. They left turn 4 together but Clauson’s midget had more speed and he edged Hagen at the line for the win and bonus in a most exciting fashion.

    For not having seen racing at Canyon for so long, it was an outstanding way to return. Track conditions were great and the very well run show was slowed only by driver mishaps. Being a track with no electricity, Canyon relies completely on generators. However, electric racing certainly dominated the Western Worlds.

     

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

    Barstow, CA…Opposites. Hot and Cold. Up and Down. Thursday night of Trophy Cup and Thursday night of Oval Nationals. October 17 in Tulare came with at least 15 flips, many yellows, and a race that once over brought more relief than entertainment. Two weeks later, the same division of sprint cars presented an excellent program in Perris with zero red flags and only 4 yellows the entire night.

    On a nearly perfect surface, 35 nonwing injected 360 sprints under USAC sanctioning put on a smooth and very efficiently run show with a 9:10 pm conclusion and excellent main. Charles Davis Jr. started things with a 16.739 quick time, leading to four invert six, take four heats that had their own share of action. Some good competition for the final transfer spot made the heats very worthwhile and the fastest 8 of those 16 transfers ran a dash.

    Ryan Bernal had some luck getting a transfer to the dash since he needed either Danny Faria Jr. or Jon Stanbrough to falter in heat 4. Stanbrough was the loser in a bumping incident and Bernal got the dash spot and the pole to boot in the 8-invert plan for the five lap effort.

    Richard Vander Weerd won the dash from the outside front row over Faria to create the front row of the 30 lap main. The track was showing some dust in turns 1 and 4 by now, but along with that came some sliders, certainly an acceptable trade-off. R. Vander Weerd, the Trophy Cup nonwing champion 14 days prior, led 4 laps until 2nd running and 3rd starting, Mike Spencer used the top of turn 4 to take the lead.

    Spencer controlled things until 8th starting Bryan Clauson put a mid-race turn 3 slider on Bernal for 2nd and closed on Spencer. Lap 20 a big turn 3 and 4 slider put Clauson in front, Spencer 2nd and 12th starting Matt Mitchell now 3rd with some traffic in front of the lead trio. With only a single yellow through lap 12, the race then slowed twice, after 26 and 27 laps had been counted.

    Stating later he received some good input from his father, Spencer used another turn 3 and 4 slide effort to pass Clauson and led the last 3 times around the racy half. A last lap effort by Clauson saw him bang the turn 4 wall, staying upright, but stopped while Spencer took the checkers over Mitchell and Bernal.

    An excellent night of racing was impacted by not only being a Thursday but also it was Halloween. Looking ahead, next year if Perris uses this same weekend then Halloween falls on the Friday night of the Oval Nationals, and even worse, a year later it would be on Saturday.

    Friday a 53-car field of USAC sprints were assisted by 15 senior sprints and 20 lightning sprints (mini-sprints) in a late running evening. Showing how the average of sprint car drivers has become lower, a senior sprint is for a driver age 45 and over. Showing my age, when I first began writing in 1992 at San Jose Speedway, many sprint car drivers were 45 or older and the under 21 driver was unheard of. Now the under 21 sprint car driver includes some of the best around.

    Time trials were led by Dave Darland at 16.126 with the top 40 in qualifications running one of five invert 6, take 4 heats. It took just over 80 minutes to run a C main for qualifiers 41 and higher and 9 total heats for the 3 classes. Just as the night before, some excellent racing took place during heats as drivers vied for the valuable top 4 finish. Then the show’s pace slowed considerably, starting with a time consuming B main. The B was on a very racy surface, but the dust was flying.

    As it turned out, the A main might have been better if the track did not receive a grooming that ate more clock. Track prep was probably needed since increased dust would have been unacceptable, especially with the breeze blowing into the stands. Nic Faas led all 30 laps off of the outside front row as the main inverted six of the heat transfers. At times Faas had a half straightaway lead while racing for 2nd was close all the way. Chase Stockton had that spot for all 30 laps also, but the pressure on the Indiana driver was also there all the way.

    Bryan Clauson was 3rd for a lap before Brady Bacon used the low line around the half-mile to take 2nd on lap 2. Bacon raced with Stockton most of the final 28 laps before taking a 3rd. The lap 2 Bacon move was the last podium pass on a track that, while not exactly one lane, had a more preferred lane than I recall seeing at Perris in the past. Clauson was 4th, Mike Spencer 5th and Dave Darland wound up the top six point cars and received a free pass to Saturday’s main.

    The final night of the 18th Annual Oval Nationals drew 2 less nonwing 410s but otherwise the same counts. Heats were again good, especially being invert 4, and taking only 2. A pair of B mains elevated another 5 each to the A with added provisionals eventually making a 27 car field.

    Of that large group, only one ever led the 40 lap test and that was Dave Darland, capturing another Oval Nationals crown and the $15,000 accompanying check. A dash for the six Friday locked in cars put Darland on the pole, but fellow front row starter, Mike Spencer, won the dash over Darland to switch the two in the A main grid.

    Darland led with relative ease until a lap 32 red created an interesting finish. Bryan Clauson had started 4th and reentered the top 3 on lap 30 with a move under Nic Faas in turn 2. Two laps later he used the bottom of turn 4 to take 2nd from Spencer and the red was what he needed as Darland was well ahead before the stop.
    Heavy pressure from Clauson on the restart was the first challenge Darland had to deal with and as lap 38 ended Clauson was inside Darland at the line and alongside. Racing into turn 1, Clauson had the line he wanted and the potential pass seemed likely, but a yellow flew and that challenge ended. The final two laps saw Clauson try every move possible but Darland held his line to win over Clauson and Spencer.

    It was announced that tomorrow (Monday) the 2014 schedule will be released so the Ovals vs. Halloween thing will soon be known. My sprint car season is not over as later this month a Canyon Raceway Park visit will provide more nonwing entertainment. In between is the Duel in the Desert, not sprint cars but one of the best racing events I see all year when a ton of cars invade Las Vegas Dirt Track.

     

     

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

    Lincoln, CA…After 19 years of annual events, I thought nothing that much new would occur at the 20th Annual Trophy Cup. I just expected another year of excellent racing action using the best format ever invented. What I did not expect is three days of such dramatic racing that the first 19 years seem almost routine compared to what occurred on the Thunderbowl Raceway clay.

    Things started on a disappointing note when only 29 of 41 pre-entered nonwing cars showed up on Thursday. The purse, over $32,000 was something like 2 ½ times as much as the usual payout for the nonwing 360 field. The previous Saturday at nearby Kings Speedway in Hanford, 27 drivers were on hand for the much smaller purse. Being on a Thursday is, of course, a factor, but with a year’s advance notice it would seem like more teams could make necessary arrangements to run this race.

    On the other hand, maybe having only 29 was a good thing or the nonwing night might have taken 3 days to run on its own. A plethora of cars getting upside down and multiple hospital runs made a small field into a large mess. For the record, each of the 4 drivers that visited the hospital was OK other than the expected bruise or two and soreness.

    The total count of cars getting upside down on the Thursday night is debatable, but I am going with the Lance Jennings count at 14 with 10 during the 2nd main. The Tulare welding truck made so many appearances for fence repair that I had it scored 12th in the 2nd A main, and on the lead lap.

    After racing 30 laps nonstop at Hanford less than a week earlier, many of the same drivers were on hand in Tulare for a much different night. Two cars were done for the night after hot laps and Ryan Bernal followed suit following hard ride into the turn 4 wall in qualifying. The small field shrunk to the point that a B main was not needed.

    While a berm built up, the track was smooth, but fast and maybe some drivers were just plain driving over their head. The high point car, Andy Forsberg, was taken out and done just 8 laps into the first A main, driven into the turn 3 wall by an overly aggressive competitor.

    After Matt Mitchell set quick time and some decent heats, Max Adams led the first 2 laps of the invert 12 opener and Danny Faria Jr. the rest to win over Geoff Ensign and Austin Liggett. With all events earning points, the first main ended with Faria the point leader, followed by Adams, Liggett, and Richard Vander Weerd. Their success was rewarded with the last two rows location in the 2nd main, oddly enough the place to be in this fully inverted main.

    The 2nd main was messy, to say the least. Requiring nearly an hour and a half to complete 40 laps, it resembled a nonwing destruction derby at times, such as when, with 10 laps complete, 4 cars were strewn around the oval, three of which I believe flipped. One was the race leader, Matt Mitchell, who had something go very wrong to get upside down in turn 2.

    Geoffrey Strole used the outside front row spot to lead 8 laps before 14th starting Mitchell used the bottom of turns 2 and 4 to go 3rd to 1st on lap 9. Mitchell was 8th in the first main and was running very well when disaster ended his run. Landon Hurst led on the restart until Richard Vander Weerd used the bottom of turn 2 on the 35th lap to make the winning pass.

    R. Vander Weerd collected the win and Trophy Cup title. Kyle Hirst was 2nd in the final main ahead of Hurst, Bud Kaeding and James Sweeney. For all the problems this night of racing produced, it still came down to the wire. If Hirst could have gotten past R. Vander Weerd, Hirst would have won the Cup title by a half point.

    The top ten in nonwing points were, Richard Vander Weerd (324.5), Kyle Hirst (315), Bud Kaeding (307), Danny Faria Jr. (301.5), Max Adams (283.5), Landon Hurst (281.5), James Sweeney (280), Austin Liggett (273.5), Scott Hall (257.5), and Matt Mitchell (254). R. Vander Weerd earned approximately $5,550 for his evening of work.

    The next two nights were far smoother running, unlike last year when the winged nights produced more than their share of red flags. The 81-car field was the 2nd largest in Tulare Trophy Cup history, just four less than last year’s top turnout. With 14 entrants not showing, it turned out to be a good thing, making for 14 fewer drivers to face a qualifying abyss.

    Some solution to the time trial thing must be out there, but every new idea carries its own issues. One thing seems clear to me, this year was absolutely not fair. While getting a decent qualifying result held up through 38 cars, the following 43 drivers faced degrading track conditions. Evan Suggs was 20th quick, the 38th car out, but following him only Jac Haudenschild and Jonathan Allard could make the top 24 group, surrounding Suggs with 19th and 21st quick.

    Considering the top 24 qualifiers, 22 came from the first 38 cars and 2 from the following 43 cars to hit the track. Brad Sweet was able to turn a 9th quick lap as the 33rd qualifier, but shortly after that the track must have gone south. When drivers such as Shane Stewart and Sean Becker drew 76th and 77th to qualify, ideas of winning the Trophy Cup became hoping to make the 48-car inversion.

    Last year was much better, Jonathan Allard was 7th quick and was the 64th car to qualify. That was not because it was slick early, Craig Stidham was 5th quick and was the 3rd car to time in. I don’t recall the start time for qualifying last year nor the weather, but this year’s low 80s day with a 4:30 qualifying date did not work for the last half of the pill draw list.

    Keeping in mind that points for qualifying, heats, and mains are compiled to find the champion, every time a driver is on the 3/8 mile their final standing is being created. This year’s half point drop per qualifying position made the point gaps smaller and Tim Kaeding’s fast time (15th car to time in) was only a half point better then 2nd quick, Carmen Macedo (2nd to time in).

    Friday heats were excellent with great racing for the 3rd and final transfer spot dominating the six heats, inverting six by points. Preliminaries continued until a 24 car field was set for an A main, inverting 12 by points. After 30 laps the first photo finish in Trophy Cup history was recorded, or perhaps the first transponder finish is more accurate.

    Shawn Wright led a lap before David Gravel ran the upper line to take over, leading all but the last foot or so of the main. Starting 2nd, Gravel was chased by T. Kaeding from 10th starting for the last 10 laps. Coming to the checkers, Gravel’s engine soured and Kaeding moved under the Connecticut driver to win by 0.003 seconds, according to the transponder readout.

    This was the most talked about main event finish in Trophy Cup history, but only for 24 hours. Some thought Gravel seemed to be the winner, but luckily the result made no difference in Gravel’s final point standing of 8th. Tim Kaeding tied Kyle Hirst for 4th in final points and Kaeding got the spot due to a faster qualifying time. Had Gravel been the Friday main winner, Hirst is now 4th and Kaeding 5th, but they are teammates with Roth cars so it is kind of the same either way.

    Just when one figures Friday’s main cannot be topped for a finish, Saturday’s main does just that. Very tough heats for the top 48 in points move the top 20 in the point list to the A main, no matter where they finish in a heat. Incoming high point car, Tim Kaeding, finished 4th from 8th while 2nd in points, Kyle Larson, had the same result.

    They were still the top 2 in points entering the fully inverted main, sharing the 12th row and a 3.5 point difference favoring Kaeding. With a 5 point drop per position, whoever finished ahead of the other was the top candidate to win the Cup, assuming they both moved forward during the 50 laps.

    I figure every sprint car fan in the country pretty much knows what unfolded during the main. Steven Tiner led 18 laps from outside row 1 before 7th starting Brad Sweet took over. Early on, T. Kaeding was ahead of Larson, but that changed in time and Larson had the point lead. Jason Meyers made a run and was ahead of Larson and had the point lead for a few laps. Going where few have gone successfully on the Tulare clay, Larson passed Meyers on the topside of turn 2 on lap 39 and led the Cup point battle the last 11 laps.

    A final yellow with 3 laps left set up a finish that made Friday’s seem mundane by comparison. Larson had the title sewn up, barring some mechanical issue, but wanted the race win also. Last lap Larson is against the wall from the middle of turn 3 and 4 on, Sweet a few feet below the top, and contact at the exit of turn 4 left Sweet upside down and Larson battered.

    Video of the situation indicates Sweet slid into Larson, leading to a battered and bruised sprint car limping across the finish line with Larson hanging on for the main event win and Trophy Cup title. No question about it, Larson deserved the win and title with his performance over the two days, but should he have gotten both honors?

    Everyone I have spoken with agrees with me in that the red absolutely should have been thrown and the race restarted. Yes, Larson would have had the Trophy Cup title he wanted so much taken away by a last turn, last lap mistake not of his doing. Jason Meyers very likely would have won the title as beneficiary of the turn 4 tangle. I guess it was the most unusual finish to any main event I have ever seen and, coupled with the Friday transponder finish, should provide discussion for some time.

    Recognition to a driver who overcame pill draw blues in dramatic fashion goes to Sean Becker. Pulling the 77th pill, his qualifying time on a worn out track got him a spot in a non-qualifier heat where he finished 2nd to move on to the C. That led to disaster when a turn 4 skirmish saw no laps completed for Becker and a DNF.

    With nothing going right on Friday, Becker made the most out of it one could imagine, starting with a Saturday D main visit. A 2nd place finish moved him to the C, starting 9th and making a charge off of the top of turn 4 on the last lap to earn the 4th and final transfer spot.

    Becker started the B main in 22nd and continued his amazing night with another 4th and final transfer finish. Since the 4 B main transfers are always the lowest 4 point cars and therefore fill the front two rows of the fully inverted main, Becker started the finale on the pole. It would be incredible if he won the main, but a wall banging adventure on lap 12 ended his great evening.

    It is a guess, but I would certainly bet that Sean Becker was the first driver in Trophy Cup history to make the A main on Saturday after starting the evening in the D main. The concept of “running the alphabet” at a Trophy Cup just does not happen, but having a driver of the caliber of Sean Becker in a D main is equally rare.

    As always, the biggest winner at the Trophy Cup was the Make-A-Wish Foundation. This year’s contribution will be $132,000, bring the total for the 19 years the Cup has donated to the Foundation to $932.000. Next year the million dollar mark will be reached, an amazing level of support from a race. The donations started in year 2 of the event.

    Every year the Trophy Cup seems to be more dramatic and special than any year prior. I think the 2013 version will make the 20th Annual unbeatable for thrills and spills. Then again, maybe not!

     

     

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

    Lincoln, CA…Kings Speedway in Hanford ended the sprint car portion of their season in grand fashion, hosting 27 winged 410s and a like number of nonwing 360s. Being a King of the West sanction, having race director Mike Andreeta on hand kept the show moving along. The nonwing portion was the final USAC West Coast point race and Danny Faria Jr. claimed the title. One more King of the West race is scheduled to conclude their season.

    It is great to see Kings Speedway draw people and cars like the October 12th show did, the Cotton Classic being the event title. Named after a major crop in the area, the Classic produced an entertaining conclusion to my racing weekend, coming after a great Friday show at Bakersfield Speedway with 154 stock cars in five classes.

    Tim Kaeding produced fast time before a trio of invert four, take five heats preceded a B main that moved 7 more to the finale. In between a dash set the first four rows and all that preliminary action led to Garrett Netto getting the pole with Kyle Hirst alongside. Jason Meyers and T. Kaeding filled row two, all of which helped create 30 laps of excellent action on the racy 3/8.

    Hirst got the jump to lead 7 times around before Meyers passed him on the bottom of turn 4 on the 8th circuit to take over. Hirst was right back on top a lap later, using the lower area of turn 2, and a yellow flew with 10 complete. On the restart, T. Kaeding moved into 2nd by using the bottom of turn 4 as the green reappeared. Hirst, T. Kaeding, and Meyers put on a very good show, racing each other while the last 16 laps went nonstop.

    Hirst got a bit sideways in turn 2 on the 20th lap and T. Kaeding and Meyers were past him in an instant, Hirst falling to 3rd. Turn 2 continued to be the site of drama when Meyers regained the lead on lap 24, using the lower piece of clay to get the drive off of the turn to pass T. Kaeding.

    Finishing the race in dramatic fashion, T. Kaeding used that popular bottom of turn 2 spot to take the lead on the last lap and held it to the line to win over Meyers and Hirst. The track was perfect, the top 3 put on a show racing each other, and the dramatic finish put the icing on the cake.

    The USAC race also was very good and Netto was on the pole for this one, also. Running both divisions, Netto winding up on the pole of both mains defied the odds, and came after winning both dashes. Other drivers running both divisions were Kyle Hirst and Bud Kaeding.

    Netto led a lap before Marcus Niemela used his outside front row spot to take the lead in turn 2, using the bottom. Fourth starting Hirst took the lead on lap 4, leaving turn 4 on the bottom for the move. That lasted only one lap and Niemela led again after a drive down the backstretch. Lap 9 saw Hirst used a turn 2 slider while Niemela went high in the turn and Hirst led again over Netto and Niemela.

    Again Niemela used the backside for a pass, regaining 2nd before Netto pitted just before the halfway point, elevating Richard Vander Weerd to 3rd. Hirst built a larger lead while Vander Weerd got past Niemela for 2nd with ten to go. Hirst reached traffic, Vander Weerd closed, and on the next to last lap Hirst slid off the top of turn 2 with the help of a bent steering part.

    Hirst’s misfortune allowed both Vander Weerd and Niemela to get by with Vander Weerd leading the last two laps for the win. The fifth and final lead change settled this one with the Vander Weerd win coming over Niemela and Hirst. Danny Faria Jr. was 8th, good enough to claim the 2013 title. Faria had a strong latter part of the season, claiming 3 in a row at one point, to earn the championship.

    Just over 22 miles from Kings Speedway in Hanford the sprint car center of attention will focus this week on Tulare Thunderbowl Raceway. The 20th Annual Trophy Cup has drawn 42 nonwing sprint car entries and 96 winged teams in pursuit of the record purse of approximately $165,000. The nonwing field is considerably tougher than last year’s first version and the winged group is, as always, exceptionally talented.

    Often given credit for the best format in racing, the Trophy Cup is also famous for its support of the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Another huge check will be presented to the Foundation on Saturday night, made possible by the large number of activities that are the source of the funds. All 138 of the race teams have been a part since every dollar of the entry fees is donated to Make-A-Wish.

    A couple of changes have been made, starting with qualifying. Instead of a one-point drop per position in qualifying results, it will be a half point this year. This will lessen the point gap at event’s end and it is the highest point total that determines the Trophy Cup champion.

    With support from Abreu Vineyards, a bonus program for heat races has been added to the purse. On Friday, the fastest qualifier starts 6th in each of the heat races. If that driver wins the heat, a $500 bonus will be paid to that driver. If the fastest qualifier in a heat does not win, a $200 bonus will be paid to the driver that passes the most cars in that heat. If event of a tie for most cars passed, the bonus will go to the driver with the better finish.

    On Saturday the highest point cars start 8th in each heat. The same $500 or $200 bonus will be paid following the procedure used on Friday. The heats for the fastest 72 qualifiers on Friday or the top 72 in points on Saturday are the only heats eligible for the bonus.

    The race event that so many race teams and fans wait for is just two days away from invading Tulare. The Trophy Cup has a long history of exciting racing combined with its dynamic format, and the 20th Annual starting this Thursday in Tulare expects to continue that tradition.

     

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

    Lincoln CA…The first Saturday of October was the last winged 360 race of the season for Marysville’s quarter mile with 30 winged and 14 nonwing spec sprints on hand. Nice weather plus an exciting finish on a very good track surface made it a winning night for the track and a pair of drivers.

    Track preparation was just right, one sign being the pit stands were not under siege from clay rockets being thrown from right rears. Zero dust meant it did not go too far in the other direction, either. Whatever was done, if the same process could produce the same surface weekly it would be wonderful. Of course, weather conditions make track prep a puzzle to solve every race.

    The nonwing spec sprint main was led by Rowdy McClenon until less than a handful of laps remained. Dealing with a deflating tire as well as a closing Cortney Dozier, a little backstretch contact between the pair put Dozier into the lead and 3 laps later the win. Shawn Jones was 2nd over Peter Paulson while McClenon’s tough luck had him cross the line in 9th.

    The wing format inverted six and took four out of the heats with the fastest six making a transfer going to a redraw. All that activity put Andy Gregg on the outside of the front row, a starting spot he used to full advantage by leading 29 ¾ of the 30 lap race. Unfortunately for Gregg, the only time past the flagstand that matters is the last one.

    Shawn Wright was in 2nd for 16 laps before 7th starting Becker used the top of turn 4 to take the runnerup spot. Becker closed on Gregg, using the top of turn 4 each lap to put pressure on the leader. The last turn of the last lap was when Becker used the very top groove in turn 4 to squeeze past Gregg and finish the excellent evening of racing with his exciting pass. Eleventh starting Jonathan Allard was 3rd over Wright and Mason Moore.

    Next week will bring one of the most awaited events in the country when the 20th Annual Trophy Cup is hosted by Tulare Thunderbowl Raceway. Somehow this event seems to continue to get better and this year follows that patters. Trophy Cup records will be set for car count and purse with 137 cars entered and a purse that is approximately $165,000, drawing the usual very strong field of teams.

    In 1994 Dave Pusateri, the owner of Trophy City in San Jose CA, came up with the idea of an event that featured a main event that was fully inverted, putting the fastest cars at the rear for a passing filled race. The event was called the Trophy Cup and its remarkable history continues this year with the 20th annual event.

    It is a winged and nonwinged 360 sprint show that draws attention to the West Coast from across the country. The Cup reaches a dramatic conclusion from the final night main that puts the highest point cars at the rear of the 24 car field. From qualifying on opening night to heat races and mains, drivers earn points and the highest total after the racing ends wins the Trophy Cup. There are two parts to the purse money, part is paid in the usual racing method and the remainder is used to pay the top 24 cars in the point tally.

    Last year was the first time ever to include nonwing 360 sprints for a very special Thursday night of racing. The nonwing sprints return this year, chasing a much larger purse with the $32,175 total paid between racing and point results. Qualifying and heat races will award points and two main events will be raced. The first main will invert 10 cars by points while the second main completely inverts the field. Point totals will determine the overall champion to conclude a very busy night of racing.

    The next two nights winged 360 sprints follow a similar format with a full program each night. Drivers qualify only on Friday and that night’s point results are used to create lineups for Saturday’s preliminary races. When the final 50 lap main goes green on Saturday, a 24 car inversion will test the highest point cars as they race their way to the front to gain maximum points.

    After qualifying, each time a driver is on the Thunderbowl Raceway clay, points can be earned by passing cars. There is no being complacent while cruising around the 3/8 oval while in 3rd place in a heat race. More points can be earned by racing into 2nd, for example, and when the two days of points are earned in the winged action, the champion is the top point driver.

    The Trophy Cup has always been a cooperative effort among businesses, the host track, fans, and all the volunteers that shape the Trophy Cup organization. The event has earned the Short Track Race of the Year from National Speed Sport News, an award befitting the level of competition that fans have enjoyed each year.

    San Jose Speedway was the host track until closing in 1999 and the inaugural victory went to Ronnie Day. A one day format in its early years, two mains were raced and Day won the first one and started next to last as a result of his point total in the finale. His 7th place finish in the 2nd main was enough to garner the top point total for the night and the championship. The first 3 years the show featured winged 410 sprints.

    Kevin Pylant won in 1995 after running 4th in each main while the following year Brent Kaeding won his first of 4 titles in what was the last year as a 410 event and also the last year as a one day Cup. Concerns over car count prompted the change to the 360 engine and the move to a two day format allowed teams to not have to race two mains in one night.

    In 1997, drivers were in the pit area from 9 states and Mark Kinser took the treasure back to Oolitic, IN. Kinser, making his only appearance in the event, was 6th quick and won his heat and the opening night main. He backed up that performance with a 2nd in the closing night’s heat and finished 2nd in the main, coming from 24th.

    Brent Kaeding won his 2nd title in 1998 despite being only 11th in points after the first night. His 2nd place finish in the final night’s main continued a trend of the champion finishing runner-up. The following year was the last for San Jose Speedway as the track closed and an era in racing concluded. Brent Kaeding was champion again, finishing the popular 2nd in the final fully inverted main after starting 18th. Terry McCarl won the Saturday main, the last race ever on San Jose’s third mile clay.

    Watsonville Speedway hosted the Cup in 2000 and Tommy Tarlton was the champion, again seeing a Cup title going to the 2nd place finisher in the final main. Tarlton started 16th as he was only 9th in points as the final 30 laps unfolded. The following year the Cup was held at Kings Speedway in Hanford and Craig Stidham won the championship, coming from 21st to 2nd in the final main. In 2002 it was Tim Kaeding winning his first Cup title, collecting the Friday main and finishing 2nd in the Saturday main, coming from 23rd. It was the 6th consecutive year that the champion finished 2nd in the final main, having to come from the back rows each year to claim the title.

    The 2003 version was the closest in Cup history and it was a last lap, last turn pass that made Steve Kent the champion by the slimmest of margins. Ricci Faria passed Tim Kaeding in the last turn, lessening Kaeding’s point total by five and allowing Kent to win the point battle by 2 points. Ronnie Day also came so close to winning, needing to pass only one more car for the title.

    The 2004 Cup was the last at Kings as the track closed in August the following year, at least temporarily. Ronnie Day was again so close to a title, winning the Saturday main from 18th, but coming up 5 points short of Jac Haudenschild’s total. The Ohio driver known as the Wild Child passed 34 cars over the two day span to earn the honor.

    Tulare Thunderbowl, about a 30 minute drive from Kings Speedway, took over the 2005 version on short notice after Kings shut their doors. An unusual Saturday main developed when Brent Kaeding and Mike Faria were ahead enough in points before the 40 laps started that whoever finished in front of the other would win the title. BK went from 24th to 4th, passing 5 drivers in one six lap stretch to edge Faria for his 4th title. His son, Tim, won the main on Saturday.

    The 2006 show saw Tim Kaeding win his 2nd title to total six Cup wins for the well-known racing family. TK started 19th and finished the seemingly magical 2nd in the Saturday main to capture the Cup. Then in 2007 it was Jason Meyers from nearby Clovis who won the title, finishing 3rd from 20th on Saturday to establish the 2nd largest margin of victory in the 14 years.

    In 2008 the first ever three day event drew 59 teams to Tulare and most who have seen every Cup version agree it was one of the most exciting years. Superb track conditions led to equally fantastic racing, especially for Brad Sweet. Finishing 3rd in the final night’s main event after starting 24th, Sweet collected $11,000 after edging Sammy Swindell by six points.

    In 2009 the idea of a three day winged show was dropped to help lessen expenses for teams. To control the car count, only 65 cars were allowed to enter and a flurry of entrants on the last postmark date allowed, built the field to 72. Keeping the car count to a manageable level was necessary as the fairgrounds has a state imposed curfew.

    History was made in that year when Tim Kaeding won his 3rd title and 7th for the famous racing family. The Saturday night main event winner had never come from last starting (24th). TK accomplished that feat in 2009 when he used every inch of the Thunderbowl clay to collect a thrilling main event win on the 2nd night and capture the Cup.

    In 2010 it was finally time for Jonathan Allard to enjoy victory at the Trophy Cup. Often in position to claim the title as Saturday’s main went green, problems seemed to follow Allard to deny a Cup crown. That changed in 2010 when Allard raced from 24th starting to 4th on Saturday to become the champion by a larger than usual 14 point margin.

    In 2011 Stevie Smith won the Friday main event over a 70 car field despite never racing on the Tulare Thunderbowl clay before. The second night produced a dominating main event win for Kyle Larson while the race for Cup champion reached new heights.

    A lap 48 yellow set up one of the most dramatic finishes in Cup history. Jonathan Allard was 3rd, Jac Haudenschild was 4th, and they were nose to tail on the restart as they raced each other for the title. Haudenschild passed Allard on the bottom in turn 1 of the 49th lap, Allard came back in turn 2 and they crossed the line to end lap 49 in a near tie. Had their not been one more lap, a photo finish would have settled the Cup.

    The duo entered turn 2 on the final lap side by side, Haudenschild on the top, and he used that ground to get a good push off of the turn to lead Allard down the backstretch, adding a pass on Roger Crockett to finish his final lap. Allard dropped to 4th at the line and Haudenschild had won the Cup title over Allard and Brad Sweet.

    Last year an 85 car field of winged sprints tested the Thunderbowl clay, and unfortunately, all too often the Thunderbowl wall. Rico Abreu won the Friday main after Roger Crockett’s lead was erased by a car flipping off the wall in front of Crockett. Jason Meyers won his 2nd Cup title on Saturday by finishing in the popular 2nd place spot, coming from 23rd to establish a larger than usual point gap after the 50 laps were scored.


    Sponsorship from Southwest Contractors helps create a guaranteed $25,000 payoff for the Cup champion this year. After the $117,940 purse is paid, Southwest Contractors will make up whatever difference there is between the champion’s share and $25,000, raising the overall purse to approximately $128,940. Drivers that start the Saturday night main event are guaranteed $2.000 minimum for their Cup earnings. The new heat race bonus program will add a minimum of $2400 to the purse for winged sprints.

    The Thursday purse for nonwing sprints is $32,175, much more than the division usually races for. The Thursday show will have two mains for the top 24 in points. The first main will invert 12 by points while the second main inverts all 24. With the increased payouts for both winged and nonwing nights the total paid out over the three days will approach $165,000 to set a new event record.

    A significant change this year is a one half point drop per position in qualifying. Cutting the drop from a full point to one half will make for closer than ever point standings. It will also make passing cars in every race all the more critical as each car passed earns more points for a driver.

    The Trophy Cup organization has supported the Make-A-Wish Foundation every year and every penny of entry fees is given to the cause. Additional activities such as a golf tournament, auction, and other items add to the huge amount that has been donated to the very worthy cause. The Trophy Cup has raised over $800,000 for the Make-A-Wish Foundation. The entire event is possible only through many volunteers supporting the Cup as well as the outstanding support from the host track, Tulare Thunderbowl.

     

     

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

    Lincoln CA…Chico’s season closed is the usual way, the two day Pacific Sprint Nationals. This was once a three day event with winged 360s only, drawing over 90 cars. The field was split between Thursday and Friday while Saturday was a main event only night. The last year of that format was 2009 when 74 sprints made for a large enough field to make the three day deal work.

    The following year was the first of the two day Fall Nationals and the sprint field fell to mid-50s, but everyone ran each night. Then in 2011 the show was changed to a three division effort, adding nonwing spec sprints and modifieds. This year continued that plan and created a packed pit area and maybe too full of a plate to comfortably run given the state mandated curfew.

    Friday opened with 46 winged 360s supported by 32 total cars in two support classes. Early qualifiers dealt with a still slick track, dooming some to C or B main assignments later that evening. One glaring example was Jonathan Allard, a superb qualifier at Chico, but coming out 3rd led to a 35th quick time.

    The last six cars to qualify produced five of the fastest six times. Now if that is not a glaring example of pill draw skewing a race night, then I don’t know what would be. Only Sean Becker broke the late qualifier dominance with his 4th quick coming as the 20th car out.

    Between these time trial results and the 2nd night offering a freight train main event, partly due to a marathon of pre-qualifying hot laps, the idea of passing/finishing point draw heats needs to be considered. California seems fixated on time trial formats that produce heats where there is often no incentive for a car running a heat in 4th place to even think about trying to be 3rd.

    A time trial format too often produces heats where following is the norm, not trying to pass. Also, the Friday heats inverted 4 and took 5 to the A main, so the fastest car in each heat did not have to pass anybody to make the dash, and could go backwards one spot and still benefit from the dash invitation. At the same time, a driver could start 10th and race up to 3rd in a heat and get nothing for the effort. Heats took top 2 to the dash, plus the 2 fastest qualifiers that did not finish top two but did make top five.

    Friday’s main was on a very good track surface, led initially by Andy Gregg. Sean Becker used the bottom of turn 2 on consecutive laps to move from 3rd to the lead, enjoying that spot from laps 11 to 21. Gregg came back to lead lap just lap 22 with a low turn 4 pass, but Becker used the top of the same turn to regain the lead a lap later.

    Becker held off Gregg for the win while Tim Kaeding took 3rd from 12th starting for the final podium spot, using the low area of turn 2 for that move on lap 26 of the 30 total. The nonwing Spec Sprint field saw Dustin Thompson led 2 laps before Rowdy McClenon took over to win over Colton Slack and Don Emery. McClenon won the track title with 4 wins during the season. Slack finished one spot better the next night, winning over Scott Hall and Geoff Ensign.

    Saturday brought extended hot laps but a track that produced a much wider range among the fastest six. Allard’s quick time came as the 18th car out and the next five were spread over the next 17 qualifiers. A fairer track than Friday for qualifying, yes, but at what price to the track surface come main event time?

    Heats were excellent, although I heard a fan grumbling at the track conditions compared to Friday. Some fans don’t get it; good racing is not going fast with less passing. Good racing was the Saturday heats with an abundance of sliders for passes or near passes, certainly the best set of heats I have seen this year at Chico.

    It would have been a perfect track for a main event, unfortunately modified and spec sprints heats and mains plus a winged sprint dash, C, and B mains were yet to happen. By main event time, the track had been used up and it all started with the long hot lap sessions followed by 100+ more laps as the 52 car field of winged sprints qualified.

    Mason Moore was in the right spot for Saturday’s main, that being the pole, and he led all 30 laps for the big win. Tim Kaeding was 2nd for all 30 laps, pressuring Moore much of the way, but as long as Moore stayed on the bottom no pass was going to occur without divine intervention. Rico Abreu ran 30 laps in 3rd to continue the trend.

    Drivers fussed about tire wear so the planned 40 lap main was cut to 30, eliminating the drama of tire conservation. Drivers fussed about the dash format on Friday and successfully got that changed. The dash was to have taken the top 2 from each heat into a redraw and then add the two fastest qualifiers who did not make a top 2 onto the rear. Instead, all cars were in the redraw after the drivers made their wishes be known…. at least some of them had complained. The fastest two qualifiers could go from 4th starting to 5th finishing and still have an equal chance of drawing the front row of the dash.

    While needing a top 2 finish in a heat to go to the dash made for some very good heat race drama, a passing/finishing point format can make even a race for 3rd or 4th very important. And no way does a car go backwards in a heat and still get rewarded in that format.

    Marysville is the focus of sprint car action this weekend, offering winged 360s and spec sprints. Things move south in a big way the following weekend with the Cotton Classic at Hanford featuring winged 410s and nonwing injected 360s, then it all comes down to the Trophy Cup at Tulare, the one so many fans and teams wait for each year.

     

     

     

    Lincoln, CA…It was great to sit in the Hanford and Tulare grandstands last weekend, the first time this season at Kings and the 3rd night this year for Tulare. A rare Friday night show in Hanford coupled with Tulare’s race just 25 or so miles away the next night made the trip south mandatory. When Northern California had rain on Saturday and canceled every track north of Madera, being 240 miles south of Lincoln proved very convenient.

    While still in a rebuilding mode, the Rebel Cup winged 360 series shows promise, particularly when the young talent from the Fresno greater area is taken into account. Names such as Steven Kent, Mitchell Faccinto, Carmen Macedo, and Luca Romanazzi are graduates of nearby Plaza Raceway’s mini-sprint program and know how to get around a track in a sprint car, too.

    A 20-car field of Rebels along with 21 USAC West Coast nonwing 360s made for perfect numbers for the all 360 evening. Three support divisions had 24 cars total so their one heat and a main program did not impact the show’s length too much.

    When living in San Jose and prior to the track’s 2005 first time closing, Kings Speedway often offered an agenda that was worth the 5 hour round trip. My favorite was when Rebel Cup was paired with the Bandit Sprints, a nonwing 360 division that essentially became USAC West Coast years later. The Rebels drew low 20s, the Bandits mid-20s, and the quality of the fields was excellent.

    In 2005 the track closed mid-season, leading to the Trophy Cup moving to its current home in Tulare. Two following attempts at promoting the 3/8 mile were unsuccessful and the track’s future was not bright. Along came Scott Woodhouse and now the place seems to be, well, back on track. Despite being a Friday and facing competition with both high school football and Fresno State football, a large crowd was on hand for this rare Friday fling.

    USAC ran their main 1st, well after D. J. Netto was quick time at 15.761 and a trio of heats helped create the grid for a 30 lap test. A six inversion assigned Danny Faria Jr. and Marcus Niemela to the front row, a spot that allowed Niemela to lead initially. Faria and Bud Kaeding were in pursuit but when Niemela slid up and a bit off the track in turn 2, a lap 3 lead change followed and Faria led.

    With Kaeding now 2nd, Richard Vander Weerd was in 3rd for a pair of laps before Vander Weerd used the bottom of turn 4 to take 2nd on lap 5. Two laps later Vander Weerd drove past Faria on the bottom of the back stretch to now lead. Just two laps elapsed before Faria again took the lead, using a drive off the bottom of turn 2. Faria led laps 9 to 30 for the win, creating a significant gap between himself and the Vander Weerd/Kaeding duo after a few more laps.

    A mid-race excursion off of turn 1 dropped Kaeding back several positions but he came back by lap 22 and was the bottom car of a three wide departure from turn 2, using that move to regain 2nd. That was the final podium pass and the Faria, Kaeding, and Vander Weerd trio ran the last 10 laps with no changes in order.

    The winged main put fast timer, Justyn Cox, starting 4th after his 13.902 quickest effort. A very strong front row of Steven Tiner and Andy Forsberg plus Craig Stidham inside row 2 made for a fast front of the pack group. Tiner led all 30 laps, Forsberg ran 2nd all the way, and Stidham followed all the way in 3rd. Sounds like an uneventful race, but that was hardly what it was.

    At times Tiner pulled away and it looked as if he was in control, then Forsberg would make up the space and challenge for the lead. From the last half of the main to the checkers, that was the scenario, repeated challenges as the laps were used up. One final effort leaving turn 4 on the last lap came up just short for Forsberg. He left the turn on the bottom, Tiner was halfway up the track, and the race to the line was a very close Tiner win.

    Twenty-four hours later and almost the same number miles away from Hanford the Tulare Thunderbowl came to life for the first time since Memorial Day weekend. On hand were 28 King of the West winged 410s, a couple 360s included, and 21 USAC West Coast nonwing 360s for another nice field of open wheel cars.

    As qualifying drew to a close, the winds seemed to increase in strength and shifted direction to fill the 3/8 oval with dust. During the time between time trials and heat one, the dust worsened such that seeing the winged sprints race that heat was a challenge. I could barely make out a car in turns 2 and 4 of the nonstop heat, then with a power outage stalling activities, the winds lessened and maybe shifted again and no dust issues followed. At Placerville the following Wednesday Tim Kaeding told me he could not see much at all in that first heat for KWS. Following his brother Bud during the heat was the only way he made it around the track.

    Peter Murphy was on hand at Tulare and looked to be well on the road to recovering from his July 20th very serious accident at Antioch Speedway. He was presented a check for $18,000 to help with expenses, made possible by an effort led by Brent Kaeding and supported by many others. In the days that followed the accident, Brent left his motorhome at the hospital so Peter’s family members could stay overnight in it. This was a prime example of racers helping a fellow racer.

    Jason Meyers started outside front row of the KWS main and led 23 laps before a tire issue ended his winning plans. Bud Kaeding, starting 6th on the adjusted initial lineup, became the leader with Meyers misfortune and collected the win over his brother, Tim, and Kyle Hirst. The race was messy to put it mildly with 3 multi-car tangles in the same spot between turns 1 and 2 involving 18 cars total, some multi-time losers in those deals. Those three reds plus another as well and four yellows threatened to turn a main into a marathon. Some very good racing took place, highlighted by Tim Kaeding’s run from deep in the pack to 2nd.

    The plan was to run the USAC main last, figuring track conditions at the end of the night would be better suited for nonwing racing. It seemed to work as the KWS main ran on a racy surface and 30 laps of pounding on the Thunderbowl clay still allowed the USAC field to have a competitive track.

    Richard Vander Weerd led 11 laps before 4th starting Bud Kaeding took over, raising the potential of a sweep. That likelihood increased as laps wound down and taking the white flag still ahead it became an almost certainty. Unfortunately for fans hoping for the sweep, contact with a lapped car on the backstretch of what should have been the final lap left Kaeding’s car sitting sideways and a very unhappy driver.

    Running an extra lap as a result, Vander Weerd collected the win over Danny Faria Jr. and 8th starting Austin Liggett, a Tracy teenager having a strong late season series of races. This combination of KWS and USAC will move back the short distance to Kings Speedway on October 12th for the Cotton Classic, another must see event in the San Joaquin Valley.

    While Tulare got by with just some short term wind, rain did a number on Northern California racing, including the Civil War finale at Placerville Speedway. Not wanting to end the point season for the series that way and being willing to risk a Wednesday night race on short notice, Placerville ran the makeup race on the following midweek date.

    With 28 winged 360s and a dozen BCRA midget lites supporting, a cool evening led to a fast track and, while passing was not easy, the fast paced racing was still entertaining as position battles filled the evening. A cool day turned into a chilly evening and the track just did not dry out as usual, making the signature two groove racing harder to create.

    An eight inversion put Tim Kaeding on the pole, a move that immediately created a likely to win choice. He did win, but not without plenty of resistance from Justyn Cox, the early leader from outside front row. Kaeding seemed to practice using the upper groove exiting turn 4 until a lap 8 effort allowed him to just edge Cox at the line.

    From there on, Kaeding led with a lap 23 yellow coming at a time when he was in very heavy traffic. Cox finished 2nd and Kyle Hirst was 3rd in the quickly run program. Dakota Albright won the midget lite main, led initially by Scott Kinney before he had a mechanical issue turn a lead into a DNF.

    It was a risk to run a Wednesday night on 3 days notice, something I am not sure any other track in Northern California would have been willing to try. Finishing at 9:20 was the result of keeping things moving, a wise choice considering the midweek situation. Sean Becker is the Civil War champion and there is no asterisk attached since Placerville was willing to run the final event in the series.

     

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

    Lincoln CA…Petaluma Speedway drew 33 winged 360 sprints last Saturday on a typical summer evening, starting out mild and turning chilly once the sun called it a day. The track seemed to change with the weather, finishing the night as a very quick 3/8 mile of clay. Another well run show ended just past 9:30, hopefully keeping the neighbors and city happy with the early conclusion.

    Mason Moore was quickest in qualifying, a 13.094 effort, leading to the usual four heats with six inverted and the top four moving directly to the A main. Half of the fastest 8 qualifiers did not make the transfer from the heats while racing for the final transfer spot was certainly intense.

    Moore, the only one of the top four qualifiers to make a transfer, watched an 8 pill being drawn for the main inversion. High school junior and varsity football player, Nathan Washam, was on the pole and had an excellent run despite a tire issue developing mid-race. Eleventh in points at Ocean Speedway, Washam was surrounded by much more experienced drivers and showed he has the skills to run with them.

    Washam led initially with Sean Becker in pursuit and David Lindt Jr. a spot further back. Moving up from nonwing spec sprint racing in 2012, Washam led through lap 7 before Becker, a series title challenger, got under Washam on the bottom of turn 4. Becker went on to lead the last 23 laps for the win, turning laps late in the main that were seven tenths of a second quicker than fast time.

    Moore took 2nd from Washam on lap 11 and the tire issue on Washam’s ride was not helping his cause. Alyssa Geving drove under Washam going into turn 1 on lap 20 to take 3rd and the podium was set with that move. Becker, Moore, and Geving took the top 3 spots with Bradley Terrell and Washam completing the top 5.

    Andy Forsberg’s recent Gold Cup finishes of a 2nd and a 3rd along with an apparent major error by the sanctioning group sets up an interesting situation. Following the Friday race at Chico a press release stated a $5000 bonus would be paid to the driver with the best combined finishes for the two mains. That was clearly Forsberg after his two podium visits.

    When the group stated the press release was in error but after the Gold Cup was finished, it created a problem suitable for one of the many TV judge shows. Based on what I was told last Saturday, the group has no intention of paying the bonus. I wonder if that would be the answer if one of the full time series travelers was the driver owed the bonus.

    An event that will have absolutely no issues with paying what is promised is the 20th Annual Trophy Cup. Now just a month away, the three day combined purse is in the $161,000 range with $32,305 going to the nonwing Cup Thursday purse and $117,940 guaranteed to the winged shows on the following two nights. The winged Cup champion will receive $25,000 after bonus money is added to the earnings from the posted purse. That amount of bonus money will not be determined until the final checkers fall on October 19.

    A change in points for qualifying could create closer point standings in the quest for high point driver. Instead of a one point drop per qualifying spot, it will be a half point for both nonwing and winged nights. Looking at last year’s results shows that this change can work in both directions.

    Ryan Bernal was the nonwing Cup champion last year even with Bud Kaeding winning both Thursday night main events. Bernal was fast time, Kaeding was 14th quick, so Bernal had a 13 point lead after qualifying. This year the same scenario would mean a 6.5 point lead.

    Although Kaeding won both mains, Bernal finished 2nd both times to lessen the point impact of the two wins. The final margin was 9 points whereas this year identical results would mean a 2.5 point margin on victory. Looking at the top 5 in overall points, Kaeding’s margin over 3rd place Kyle Hirst would be greater this year, 13.5 compared to 8 last year. The top five would still be in the same order.

    On the winged side, Jason Meyers won by 14 points last year over Shane Stewart. Because Meyers qualified 6th and Stewart 2nd, this year’s scoring would increase the margin to 16 points over Stewart, but now it would be only 15.5 over Hirst. So there is a change that would result from 0.5 scoring in qualifying, Hirst would have been 2nd in points and Stewart 3rd.

    Rico Abreu would have really gained points due to being 24th quick, enough to tie Stewart for 3rd, a spot that would have gone to Stewart as he qualified faster. Roger Crockett would still be 5th.

    Last year the change to 0.5 point differential would have only switched two positions in the top five, but that is due to the point gaps being larger than usual between the positions. Three of the top five in winged racing final points last year qualified higher than 18th in the order, so it is possible to recover from a lackluster time and finish towards the top of the point standings.

    With 128 cars entered as this moment and 12 openings remaining, all in the nonwing group, the 20th Annual Trophy Cup will not only be the highest paying ever, it will also set a record for car count. Taking into account the field of drivers that have committed to being in Tulare in a month, it will also be the strongest field ever.

     

     

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

    Lincoln, CA…Half of the four Gold Cup events have been concluded at Silver Dollar Speedway, and excellent nights of racing opened the 2013 event. Winged and nonwinged 360s have been accompanied by midgets and carbureted sprints to provide a buffet of open wheel entertainment. The first two nights of weather have been great with warmer days ahead for the next pair of evenings.

    Wednesday’s opening night drew 38 winged 360 sprints and 23 nonwing carbureted spec sprints, perfect numbers for a midweek event. Track conditions started a bit too fast but when main event time arrived the quarter mile high-banked clay surface was in excellent shape. Thursday started much the same with a fast and on the narrow side track but was again just right for main event action.

    Tracy CA high school senior, Austin Liggett, started the evening with quick time for spec sprints at 13.918 before a trio of invert six, take four heats moved six drivers into the redraw to set the first three rows of their 25 lap Hunt Series event.

    Drawing the pole, Geoff Ensign made the most of the opportunity and led all the way to collect the win for car owner, Dave Brown. Terry Schank Jr. provided pressure for 15 laps before Scott Hall and Tony Richards both drove past Schank on the bottom of turn 2 at the 16 lap mark. Ensign drew away to grab the win over Hall and Richards with the last 19 laps going nonstop.

    Winged qualifying put Willie Croft at the top of the list after his 12.442 time. A very competitive field had five cars in the 12.5 bracket and another seven landed in the 12.7 group. Four heats inverted six and moved the top four to the A main with four of the fastest 10 not making the top four. Six more from the B main created a 22 car field for a 30 lap main.

    After Dominic Scelzi drew the 10 pill to put himself on the pole, the first of six yellows flew before a lap was scored. Half the flags slowed the action in the first six laps, but it took the remaining 24 laps to see the other trio of yellows. Scelzi led with Matt Peterson and Justin Sanders following until Sanders used a turn 2 slider to take the lead on lap 6 while Justyn Cox moved to 3rd at the same time.

    Sanders started inside row 2 and had Kyle Hirst behind him by lap 8, Hirst starting 8th. Scelzi came out on the short end of contact and went off the back stretch and wound up 8th. Andy Gregg used the top of turn 4 to take 3rd from Cox but the ASCS driver regained the spot five laps later with a low side pass in turn 2.

    During a yellow after 17 laps, a right rear on Sanders’ ride was obviously low and it figured to be a matter of time for the Prunedale based driver. Sanders would easily win the tough luck award for the year and another chapter in that story was set to unfold. Lap 22 was tough luck for Cox when he dropped out with engine issues and Gregg was 3rd again.

    With the Sanders tire approaching flat, Hirst used the low groove out of turn 4 to take the lead on lap 26 and the Sanders right rear finished its race one lap later. That put Gregg in 2nd and Mason Moore in 3rd for the last 3 laps and podium positions were set. Tough luck for Sanders and Cox, but it was a very good main despite a few too many yellows.

    Thursday figured to be special, and it was when USAC 360 or restricted 410 sprints were joined by USAC/BCRA midgets for a nonwing night. With 25 sprints and 20 midgets, the numbers were just right with a few vintage and about a dozen hardtops added. What was not needed was another class, and the 22 dwarf cars put too many cars in the pit area and nearly led to a curfew shortened race.

    Fastest of the sprint was Geoff Ensign 14.354 while the co-sanctioned midget field had Ronnie Gardner post the quickest time, a 14.511 lap. Passing filled preliminaries certainly lived up to expectations of a very good night of racing, and main event action was even better.

    Midgets inverted six and Sean Becker, making his 5th career start in the class, was joined by teammate Jonathan Henry on the front row. Becker led at some point in each of the first four times in a midget, winning once, but that streak ended this night.

    Henry led from the green, Becker 2nd for 2 laps, before Jake Swanson and 6th starting Gardner passed Becker, the track winged 410 champion this season. Gardner got past Swanson on the back stretch on lap 6 and used the same stretch of clay to take the lead from Henry on lap 9.

    A four car pack was racing for the lead when misfortune and a lapped car struck Shane Golobic, sending him into an altitude impressive flip to end the Fremont based driver’s race and put Gardner’s drive on hold. When the race resumed, Gardner was untouchable while action behind him was intense.

    Swanson used the bottom of turn 2 to take 2nd on lap 11 and Matt Streeter took 3rd a lap later, driving under Henry on the bottom of turn 4. Streeter and Scott Pierovich put on a show racing for the final podium spot, one which Pierovich took with a lap 24 pass on the low side in turn 2.

    The Gardner, Swanson, and Pierovich podium came after just one slowdown on the Silver Dollar surface, one that was in perfect condition for the midget run. Seeing this one makes me dream of more midget racing on the high-banks in Chico.

    Next up was the 20 car USAC main, set for 30 laps and inverting six. Jimmy Trulli was making one of a very few career starts in a nonwing sprint and was on the pole alongside former Hanford resident, Chad Boespflug, back in California from the Midwest for a few days. Row two was filled by Andy Forsberg and Austin Liggett with Forsberg making a rare nonwing start also.

    Trulli led with Forsberg and Boespflug chasing for two laps before Liggett used the top of turn 2 to take 3rd. Goeff Ensign moved from 6th starting to 3rd on lap 7, a spot he held until lap 16 when Liggett made a turn 2 low side pass for the position.

    Trulli continued to lead, establishing a large lead until the last 10 laps unwound and traffic slowed him, allowing Forsberg to close. Things were really heating up when a lap 24 tangle in turn 4 by back of pack cars proved bad luck for Forsberg. He was unable to avoid the spun cars and suffered front end damage just as he was challenging for the lead.

    Trulli now had Liggett to deal with Kyle Hirst in 3rd after driving past Ensign and soon to be series champion, Ryan Bernal. A lap later Bernal regained 3rd and Trulli continued his smooth drive to claim the win over Liggett and Bernal. While Trulli led all 30 laps, the race had excellent position racing behind the winning driver. Trulli won his first nonwing sprint car race and did it during Gold Cup week.

    As the midgets showed, Silver Dollar and nonwing racing go together very well. With excellent support from drivers who rarely race nonwing, the size of the field was just right and half the top ten were from the winged fraternity. Two nights of right sized car counts and excellent racing on very good track conditions was certainly the way to start the 2013 Gold Cup week.

     

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

    Lincoln, CA…Silver Dollar Speedway concluded their point season with two Friday nights of good racing due to excellent track conditions. The current plan of running five or so divisions creates a decent total car count although some of the fendered classes are one heat and a main groups.

    What I have noticed of late is how much the crowd seems to enjoy the support classes almost as much as the sprint car action. I am guessing the crowd has become more of a race fan group rather than just being focused on the sprint cars. I can tell that I have adjusted to the new way at Chico since the old days of 40+ sprint cars in two divisions are gone.

    Sean Becker was one of six drivers to make all 12 point races and won the title over Andy Forsberg and Michael Tarter. Forsberg had one forgettable night when he took an ambulance ride after a heat race flip and that proved costly to his point total. Becker and Forsberg each won twice as did Andy Gregg while Roger Crockett and Willie Croft had single wins in far fewer appearances. Jonathan Allard had, by far, the best “batting average” going 4 for 7 in the win department, still finishing 7th in points despite missing almost half the races.

    The nonwing spec sprint point races were mostly a single digit field, yet some of the races were just as good as if there had been 20 of them, and maybe better. Fewer yellows is usually a benefit of smaller fields and the group of drivers that appeared regularly were a talented bunch. Out of 18 drivers that appeared, only 3 made all 8 point races and Rowdy McClenon won half of those mains to take the title over Ron Laplant.

    The economy sprints, basically a winged spec sprint, showed signs of becoming something with a car count once reaching an impressive 13. Last year was more like 5 cars at best so the percentage increase is very good. Becoming a track regular in the division seems to be an issue since only two cars made all 8 point races. One of the pair was Kyle Standley who is the track champion for 2013.

    Andy Gregg won the next to last point race with Andy Forsberg putting on an impressive run from the 3rd row to finish 2nd. Then the last point race, a tribute to Tyler Wolf, was a Forsberg win ahead of Rico Abreu and Becker. Tyler Wolf was the youngest Silver Dollar sprint car champion ever at age 19. Forsberg became the first custodian of the very impressive Tyler Wolf Memorial trophy, as he will have possession of the huge award until next year’s event.

    The very good racing conditions of the last two shows will hopefully be a sign of things to come next week when the four day Gold Cup series starts. Wednesday will be a winged 360 show with nonwing spec sprints, the Thursday calendar features no wings for the USAC sprints and midgets, then the next two nights are outlaw races. A huge amount of planning and work have created numerous accompanying activities to make the week very special.

    Chico has four days of top notch racing with most every open wheel division getting track time. Car count should be excellent and the way tickets have been selling, a large crowd is expect for each event. The track conditions of late have me thinking this will be something exceptionally good this year.

     

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

    Lincoln, CA…Petaluma Speedway offered another dose of their brand of dirt track racing on the 10th with a fast, smooth, and dust free surface accompanied by cool weather, a feature normally enjoyed at the 3/8 mile oval. An appearance by the Hunt Spec Sprint nonwing series along with BCRA midgets and midget lites made for a trio of reasons to make the trip west.

    Three consecutive weeks of racing for the BCRA divisions took a bit of a toll on car count. Having no home track means every race is on the road, but the 16 car field of midgets was still four times the USAC midget field at the paved Madera Speedway. Just 4 cars showed in Madera, apparently the result of conflicting events for some pavement racers as well as BCRA being in Petaluma on dirt. The July race in Madera drew 18 midgets when it was co-sanctioned.

    The midget lite field was also slim with 9 cars, half what competed at Antioch two weeks prior. An every other week schedule or at least not more than two consecutive weeks might fit these divisions’ plans better. Dakota Albright won the lite main with relative ease.

    Shannon McQueen set quick time, recording a new track record in the process at 14.203 before a pair of heats awarded wins to McQueen and Greg Bragg. McQueen started 10th and Bragg 5th in the 30 lap main, but it was Trey Marcham in a McQueen team car that became the center of attention.

    The Newcastle, OK traveler is just 21 years old and a mechanical engineering student at University of Oklahoma. A busy travel schedule has seen multiple appearances in California this year in the McQueen midget. Marcham started 6th in the finale, but was not in that spot for long.

    Gary Conterno led early with Marcham in 3rd after a lap, 2nd a lap later, and completed the charge to the lead with a high side pass in turn 2 on the 3rd lap. Once in front, Marcham was in charge to collect his first midget win. Some pressure was developing with 7 laps left, but Marcham added enough to his lead to erase that threat.

    Bragg used the bottom of turn 4 to move into 2nd on lap 5 while McQueen took 3rd on the 13th circuit with a low side pass in turn 2. That set the podium for the quickly run main with McQueen racing cars flanking Bragg’s ride after 30 quick laps.

    A 20 car field of nonwing spec sprints group qualified and used heats to select the redraw drivers. That activity put Colton Slack on the pole with Tommy Laliberte alongside. A 25 lap chase had just two flags slowing Slack’s run to the win. Weaving through traffic, Slack won over Laliberte and Shawn Jones from 10th starting. The next Hunt Series race in on opening night of the four day Gold Cup series at Chico on the 4th of September.

    One of the best and most highly regarded later season events in the Western US, in fact the entire country, is the Trophy Cup. This always dramatic event was created by Dave Pusateri, a sprint car fan who wanted to see racing where the fastest cars had to start in the back. Born in 1994 at San Jose Speedway, the Cup was first a 410 event but was switched to 360 engines after three years.

    Car count concerns over the dwindling number of 410 teams prompted the switch, and it has proven to absolutely to be the right move. The entry list has grown to the point that a limit is now placed on the number of teams that can race the event. California’s strict 11 pm curfew at fairgrounds tracks led to the maximum entry level and this year’s 90-car list was filled months ago.

    The Trophy Cup was held at San Jose Speedway through 1999 before the track was closed to build a concert venue that was never constructed. The track’s final race was the Trophy Cup main, won by Terry McCarl, while Brent Kaeding won the overall title.

    The event spent the next year at Watsonville before becoming a San Joaquin Valley transplant, racing the next 4 years at Kings Speedway in Hanford. In 2005 Kings closed during the season and nearby Tulare Thunderbowl Raceway stepped up to host the race, a location that is still the home for the spectacular event.

    The plan since 2011 was to have this year’s Cup event, the 20th in the series, to be the final one. Dave Pusateri was ready to end the rewarding, superbly supported, but time consuming work necessary to do all that his group of volunteers does each year. Then family members intervened, deciding to take over the bulk of the work, while Dave gets to take a huge step back and serve in a more advisory-like role. The Cup will continue, much to the delight of race teams and fans.

    The result is the prior planning done towards the 2013 Trophy Cup being the last will bring the payoff and event overall to new heights. Drivers that raced last year had priority entry for this year’s race and nearly 100% are back for the 20th version. They will be chasing the largest payout for the Cup ever.

    The initial plan when this year was to be the last was a $50,000 prize for the overall point champion. After the change in leadership following the 2013 version will lead to continuing the Cup, the total purse was not changed but the champion will receive $25,000 for the two days of winged racing. The payout was increased for other positions to spread the additional $25,000 among the field. This year’s total payout is a record $130,940 for the two days of winged 360 racing.

    Last year a 3rd day was added for nonwing 360s and Ryan Bernal was the 1st ever Cup nonwing champion, accumulating the most points after a full night of racing that included two mains. Bud Kaeding won both mains but was 9 points behind Bernal after qualifying and heat racing points were included. Last year’s $21,000 purse is much larger this year, set at $32,305. That makes the three day total $163,245, a phenomenal amount for 360 sprints.

    As well as race teams, another financial winner is the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Each year of this event every dollar of entry fees has been donated to the Foundation along with a large amount of money raised via various efforts proceeding and during the event. Those efforts have meant over $800,000 has been given to Make-A-Wish since the Trophy Cup started. Make-A-Wish, race teams, and fans all win by continuing to have this remarkable event.

     

     

    From The Grandstand by Ron Rodda

    Lincoln CA…Silver Dollar Speedway scheduled several winged 360 races on Friday point show nights, giving the 410 division a night off. The first night for this change was canceled, the 2nd time drew 19 winged 360s, and the 3rd and final effort last Friday drew 22 entries. Given the most recent two winged 410 point shows drew 15 and 13 cars, the thought of weekly 360 racing at Chico might be something to consider.

    The track conditions were among the best all season and all divisions took advantage of that to put on some entertaining racing. Even though there were only 5 nonwing spec sprints, their main was probably the best of the season in Chico when the quintet of cars raced together the entire 20 laps.

    While Don Emery did lead all the way, that does not reveal the level of competition that developed. Emery was pressured by one and sometimes two competitors before he claimed the win over Rowdy McClenon. Two grooves and dust free conditions made the evening all the better.

    An eight inversion put the track’s two time 2013 winner, Sean Becker, outside row 4, creating what figured to be an interesting charge towards the front in the Dan Menne owned ride. That charge became a bit easier when three tries to start the race and a similar number of yellows put some to the back and Becker was now starting 5th.

    Brad Bumgarner led off of the pole, chased by Kevin Sharrah until Becker used lap 3 to take the runner up spot with a topside drive out of turn 4. Eight laps later Becker took the lead, diving past Bumgarner when he slipped up the track coming out of turn 4. Becker’s 3rd Chico win came after leading Bumgarner and 12th starting Andy Forsberg to the line. Forsberg’s charge offered further interest as the laps counted down as his top of the track effort justified his Mr. Excitement nickname.

    The next night was a return to Antioch Speedway after an absence of at least 3 years. The occasion was not only to see the place again, but the draw of having BCRA midgets, a division I have never seen at Antioch as best as I can recall. It turned into a very entertaining evening of racing and one of the best midget mains I have ever seen, making it both a lucky and rewarding choice for Saturday evening.

    When Antioch was made a little larger and wider the track received positive reviews on the changes. What I saw were excellent track conditions except for a bit of a rut in turn 4 and exciting racing despite some classes having few cars. The open wheel portion of the six division show was all BCRA, midgets and midget lites.

    No qualifying was another nice touch but hot laps for all the classes put the start time about 20 minutes late. Officials do a good job of keeping things moving along and will cut laps if a race is taking too much time. The midget lite field was at 18, assisted by 5 cars from southern California. With 16 midgets on hand, I was certainly satisfied with the open wheel car count. Support classes were less, but some of the single digit divisions still had competitive mains.

    Midget lite pole car driven by Marcus Smith led 18 of the 20 laps but, coming upon a lapped car in turn 4, chose the bottom while Scott Kinney was ready to used the top. Kinney drove around the leader and lapper to lead just the last two laps for the win. Smith was 2nd and Brad Dillard took 3rd in the dramatic finish.

    The midgets put on a very thrilling main, one that got better as the 30 laps reached a conclusion. Gregg Bragg led a lap before 6th starting Scott Pierovich blasted into the lead running the high side around the fast quarter. Using the top of turn 4 to take the lead, Pierovich was pursued by Bragg until he hit the turn 4 rut, allowing Pete Davis to drive by for the 2nd spot.

    Sean Dodenhoff used the bottom of turn 4 to move into 3rd on the 9th circuit and moved one spot higher a lap later with a low groove pass in turn 2. Bragg took 3rd back following a low groove drive in turns 1 and 2. Pierovich set a blistering pace while racing the topside of the track with Dodenhoff and again Davis took 3rd after Bragg went a bit high in turn 2 on lap 16. That would turn out to be the winning pass, although it was for 3rd at the time.

    With ten laps remaining and the pace growing even more frantic, Dodenhoff closed on Pierovich before assuming the lead along the back stretch on the 22nd lap. Dodenhoff created a bit of a lead but Pierovich closed on him with 5 to go and the pair entered turn 4 glued together as the white flag was to appear. They bumped each other and the wall at the top of turn 4 leading to a slow roll for Dodenhoff and a red.

    A somewhat distant 3rd at the time was Pete Davis and he inherited the lead on the restart, leading the last 2 laps for the win. Between dramatic duels and the lead pack furiously turning laps on Antioch’s quarter, it all added up to one of the best mains I have seen this year. If only they could all be like this one.

     

     

     

              

     



A Hosehead Production

Copyright © 2014 by "Hosehead's Sprint Car Photos & News." Do not reproduce anything from these pages without the permission of the photographers, writers or webmaster.

Hosehead's Sprint Car Photos & News,PO Box 42, Drums PA 18222-0042